Dr. Andrew Feigin, MD, demonstrates a simple cognitive test to his colleague Jean Ayun, RN.Dr. Paul J. Mattis, PhD, (left) demonstrates a tabletop test of cognitive functioning, administered to volunteers. His colleague Dr. Waturo Sato, MD, PhD, is posing as a stand-in test subject.Dr. Vijay Dhawan, PhD, shows a patient/volunteer where to read the questions for a test of cognitive functioning, while the PET scanner (large, doughnut-shaped apparatus) maps changes in the patient/volunteer's brain.
Dr. Andrew Feigin, MD, demonstrates a simple cognitive test to his colleague Jean Ayun, RN.
Dr. Paul J. Mattis, PhD, (left) demonstrates a tabletop test of cognitive functioning, administered to volunteers. His colleague Dr. Waturo Sato, MD, PhD, is posing as a stand-in test subject.
Dr. Vijay Dhawan, PhD, shows a patient/volunteer where to read the questions for a test of cognitive functioning, while the PET scanner (large, doughnut-shaped apparatus) maps changes in the patient/volunteer’s brain.

Enrolling as a volunteer subject in a research study is one of the most satisfying ways you can help end the scourge of Parkinson’s and other neurodegenerative diseases.

In particular, if you have Parkinson’s disease, or even if you are a healthy individual, you may be eligible to take part in studies that can help medical scientists learn to treat and prevent this debilitating illness.

You can enroll in a research study at the Center for Neurosciences by contacting:


Toni Fitzpatrick, MA
Research Coordinator
tflanaga@northwell.edu
Phone: 516-562-2685

Loreta Quartarolo
Research Coordinator
lquartar@northwell.edu
Phone: 516-562-1168


Current research studies are focusing on the following important topics:

  • Involuntary movements, also known as dyskinesias, associated with levodopa treatment. What is the cause of this medication side effect?
  • Memory and thinking impairment and mood disorders in PD. The role of accumulated protein in the brain.
  • Effect of treatment on individuals taking medication for the first time.
  • Differences in brain activity between patients with PD and other forms of parkinsonism such as multiple system atrophy (MSA), progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), and corticobasal ganglionic degeneration (CBGD). Can brain imaging determine which disorder a patient has?
  • Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (acting out of dreams during the REM sleep phase). Is there a link between this sleep disorder and PD?

For more information about becoming a volunteer for studies of Parkinson’s disease at the Center for Neurosciences, download this brief brochure.

For general information about volunteering for medical research studies, click Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) for research participants.

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